Spanish Cultural Studies: An Introduction: The Struggle for Modernity

Spanish Cultural Studies: An Introduction: The Struggle for Modernity

Spanish Cultural Studies: An Introduction: The Struggle for Modernity

Spanish Cultural Studies: An Introduction: The Struggle for Modernity

Synopsis

Introduction 1. Culture and Modernity: The Case of Spain I: Elites in Crisis, 1898-1931 National Identities 2. The Loss of Empire, Regenerationism, and the Forging of a Myth of National Identity 3. The Nationalisms of the Periphery: Culture and Politics in the Construction of National Identity Ideological Tensions 4. The Social Praxis and Cultural Politics of Spanish Catholicism 5. Education and the Limits of Liberalism Modernismo and Modernisme 6. Literary Modernismo in Castilian: The Creation of a Dissident Cultural Elite 7. Catalan Literary Modernisme and Noucentisme: From Dissidence to Order 8. Catalan Modernista Architecture: Using the Past to Build the Modern The Avant-Garde 9. The Literary Avant-Garde: A Contradictory Modernity 10. Internationalism and Eclecticism: Surrealism and the Avant-Garde in Painting and Film, 1920-1930 11. The Musical Avant-Garde: Modernity and Tradition Popular Culture 12. Rural and Urban Popular Cultures 13. The Cuple: Modernity and Mass Culture II: The Failure of Democratic Modernization, 1931-1939 Sexual Politics 14. Women and Social Change 15. Beyond Tradition and `Modernity': The Cultural and Sexual Politics of Spanish Anarchism Intellectuals and Power 16. Reform Idealized: The Intellectual and Ideological Origins of the Second Republic 17. The Republican State and Mass Educational-Cultural Initiatives, 1931-1936 Monolithicity versus Pluralism: Political Debates 18. The Political Debate within Catholicism 19. Catalan Nationalism: Cultural Plurality and Political Ambiguity The Cultural Politics of the Civil War 20. The Republican and Nationalist Wartime Cultural Apparatus 21. Propaganda Art: Culture and the People or For the People? III: Authoritarian Modernization, 1940-1975 i. Building the State and the Practice of Power, 1940-1959 The Material Reality of State Power 22. `Terror and Progress': Industrialization, Modernity, and the Making of Francoism 23. Gender and the State: Women in the '40s Cultural Control 24. Education and Political Control 25. The Moving Image of the Franco Regime: Noticiaros y Documentales 1943-1975 26. The Ideology and Practice of Sport 27. Censorship or the Fear of Mass Culture Cultural Nationalism 28. Cifesa: Cinema and Authoritarian Aesthetics 29. Constructing the Nation: Francoist Architecture 30. Music and the Limits of Cultural Nationalism Resisting the State 31. The Urban and Rural Guerrilla of the '40s 32. Popular Culture in the `Years of Hunger' 33. The Emergence of a Dissident Intelligentsia ii. Developmentalism, Mass Culture, and Consumerism, 1960-1975 Adapting to Social Change 34. Social and Economic Change in a Climate of Political Immobilism 35. Educational Policy in a Changing Society 36. Catholicism and Social Change Opposition Culture 37. The Left and the Legacy of Francoism: Political Culture in Opposition and Transition 38. The Politics of Popular Music: On the Dynamics of New Song Artistic Experiment and Diversification 39. Literary Experiment and Cultural Cannibalization 40. Painting and Sculpture: The Rejection of High Art 41. Cimema, Memory, and the Unconscious IV: Democracy and Europeanization: Continuity and Change, 1975-1992 Democracy and Cultural Change <

Excerpt

Spanish cultural studies are in their infancy. Despite the excellent work being done in individual areas, there has to date been little attempt at interdisciplinary co-ordination. This is partly due to institutional compartmentalization, even stronger in Spanish universities than in the American or British systems where interdisciplinary programmes--particularly with the growth of gender studies-- are expanding. The problem is compounded outside Spain by the fact that in other European countries Spanish is still regarded as a minority interest, and few history or media or anthropology departments--to take some key examples--have Spanish experts. In addition, teachers wanting to introduce Spanish material into interdisciplinary courses constantly come up against the lack of availability of texts (secondary as well as primary) in translation. This book is an attempt to overcome these handicaps. Given the rudimentary state of the art, it is conceived not as a collection of model case-studies (though some of the essays are that), but as a sourcebook providing an overview of trends and issues.

Because of the lack of existing interdisciplinary work in the Spanish field, we have commissioned a large number of short essays from a wide range of specialists working in Britain, Spain, France, and the USA. A high proportion of our contributors are leading experts whose names will be familiar to many readers, and we are delighted that they found this project sufficiently exciting to want to be part of it. We have also made a point of commissioning work from young researchers bringing new ideas and approaches into their respective areas of study. All the essays have been written specially for this volume, and represent the most recent research in their fields. Although the whole of the twentieth century is covered, proportionally more space is given to the contemporary period to make the book as up to date as possible. Our aim is not so much to show what Spanish cultural studies have achieved so far as to stimulate others to do further work that will establish Spanish cultural studies as a discipline, both by introducing new material into their courses and by undertaking research of their own.

We have given quotations in English to make the book accessible to students following courses in comparative or European studies (whether in literature, film, history, politics, or gender studies), who may not have a knowledge of Spanish.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.