Fashoda, the Incident and Its Diplomatic Setting

Fashoda, the Incident and Its Diplomatic Setting

Fashoda, the Incident and Its Diplomatic Setting

Fashoda, the Incident and Its Diplomatic Setting

Excerpt

Government steamers now plying on the White Nile stop regularly at a place on the left bank, called Kodok, a week's steaming above Khartoum. If the arrival happens to be by night, nothing whatever is to be seen ashore except the glimmer of fireflies among the water reeds and, presently, a long way off, the small light of a lantern carried by the native postmaster who is coming to receive his letter-pouch. If the arrival is by day, there is visible, a quarter of a mile from the landing and beyond the swampy foreshore, an irregular row of brick buildings standing along the level skyline. A little removed to the left is a cluster of grass-thatched native tukls.

Seen casually from the steamer's deck, Kodok is the usual government post joined to a squalid Shilluk village. But, a generation ago, two great European nations were almost at each other's throats over it, for this unconsidered spot is no other than Fashoda, its name now changed. If the traveler chooses to go ashore, he will be shown Marchand's house and the old fort with its garden still well tended. But of the great exploit by Captain Marchand scarcely any memorials now remain except these kept at Kodok by his English rivals.

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