Consular Privileges and Immunities

Consular Privileges and Immunities

Consular Privileges and Immunities

Consular Privileges and Immunities

Excerpt

The aim of this monograph is to present a study of a narrow field rather than a survey of a broad one. The term "consular privileges and immunities" has been construed to apply to those exceptions from the ordinary operation of municipal law which relate specifically to the consular office; and those which any national of the consul's state might enjoy have been excluded. No attempt has been made to treat consular organization or functions; and no consideration has been given the anomalous situation in certain states where extraterritorial privileges have been granted.

In the course of time two sets of consular privileges and immunities have developed: one for the consular officer who is a national of the appointing state and who is engaged in no pursuit other than the consular occupation; and a second, more limited, group for other consular officers. As consular services have increased in size and importance, there has been a steady increase in the qualifications prerequisite to entrance into them, until today it is believed that most important consular offices are filled by nationals who engage in none other than the consular business. The present study is confined to the privileges and immunities of this class of consular officials.

It is a pleasure to acknowledge obligations under which the author has been placed in the preparation of this study. Professor Charles G. Haines, formerly of the University of Texas and now of the Southern Branch of the University of California, was instrumental in creating an interest in the subject and has been of assistance in many ways. Professors Charles Cheney Hyde and Joseph P. Chamberlain . . .

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