Evolutionary Politics

Evolutionary Politics

Evolutionary Politics

Evolutionary Politics

Synopsis

This synthesis of research into the behavior of humans and other social animals ranges horizontally from a congruence of the perspectives of the life sciences, social sciences, and physical sciences and longitudinally from that of the most recent 60 million years, but emphasizing the last 12 thousand years.

From a political science perspective, these essays focus on both individual and small-group political behavior. Schubert's work draws extensively on contemporary evolutionary theory, biosocial and psychobiological theory, ethology and primatology, behavioral ecology, experimental work in animal behavior, neurobiology, human development, and the philosophy of both life and social sciences. Introducing and concluding the book are essays that discuss the implications of biology and the life sciences for the study of political science. The others center on five topics: political ethology (naturalistic study of human behavior as animal behavior); political evolution; evolutionary theory; evolutionary development (ecological, epigenetic, and ontogenetic); and the evolution of human thinking.

Excerpt

This book is a result of my increasing involvement in the biopolitics movement for twenty years. It is based on a selection of approximately half of my forty-odd research papers written on many aspects of the biology of political behavior during the past dozen years and published originally in more than a dozen refereed periodicals and half a dozen symposia. Most of these were research articles appearing in either newsletters of interdisciplinary associations or specialized political science journals or in journals of behaviorally oriented disciplines other than political science. Only two of my biopolitical articles were published in mainstream (i.e., general) political science journals; and one of these is not an American journal. Each symposium focuses, of course, upon a specialized theme that is explored in depth by many contributors. So my biopolitical writing has appeared in diverse and widely scattered sources, very few of which are read by more than a very small minority of political scientists; and by an even smaller proportion of social scientists, or of biological or life scientists, or of other academic persons. In addition to the symposia to which I have contributed, there has been barely a handful of other biopolitical symposia or research monographs. Elliott White and Joseph Losco (1986) have edited a symposium on biosocial organizational theory, and Roger Masters (Gruter and Masters, 1986) has co-edited one on theories of exclusion from human social groups. Works by Thomas L. Thorson (1970) and Ralph Pettmen (1981) are book-length essays on biopolitical philosophy; and Peter Corning's (1983) is an encyclopedic commentary on the evolutionary roots of organizational theory. Certainly there is yet nothing even remotely like a textbook on biopolitical behavior.

Given the unlikelihood that very many political, other social, or biological scientists will have read my original articles and chapters, plus the lack of any book-

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