Hiram Walker (1816-1899) and Walkerville from 1858

Hiram Walker (1816-1899) and Walkerville from 1858

Hiram Walker (1816-1899) and Walkerville from 1858

Hiram Walker (1816-1899) and Walkerville from 1858

Excerpt

INTRODUCTION OF MR. WALTON, AT DETROIT ON SEPTEMBER 11, 1958, BY JAMES K. WATKINS, O.B.E., MEMBER, MICHIGAN COMMITTEE, IN THE NEWCOMEN SOCIETY IN NORTH AMERICA.

My fellow members of Newcomen:

In our meetings we usually hear the story of great successes starting from small beginnings. That is generally the pattern of a Newcomen address, and our interest in the small beginning may perhaps be largely measured by the magnitude of the success. We like to hear about the mighty oaks coming from the little acorns.

The acorn-oak story applies to many companies in our midst, where Canada and the United States join at the Detroit River to create North America's vast machine shop. But tonight we are not to hear about a machine shop. What differentiates Hiram Walker from so many businesses in this area is the difference between two kinds of merchandise. One kind is heavy goods--the automobile; the other is packaged goods--foods, soaps, drugs and beverages--items which the household consumes quickly and replaces repeatedly. We know a fine automobile wears a long time, and we--or at least most of us--know that, sad to say, a bottle of fine whisky wears out all too soon. Yet even if the reputation of Canadian Club itself is not based on its durability, the company that produces it has shown its strength and hardihood by completing a century of busy existence through strife, struggle, panics, and--prohibition.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.