Going Wild: Hunting, Animal Rights, and the Contested Meaning of Nature

Going Wild: Hunting, Animal Rights, and the Contested Meaning of Nature

Going Wild: Hunting, Animal Rights, and the Contested Meaning of Nature

Going Wild: Hunting, Animal Rights, and the Contested Meaning of Nature

Synopsis

First published in 1994, Going Wild offers a probing examination of the ways in which different conceptions of nature shape our responses to specific environmental issues. In this revised edition, Jan E. Dizard adds a thoughtful and extensive new chapter, updating the controversy over the state-managed deer hunt at the Quabbin Reservoir in Massachusetts and placing it in a broader national context.

Excerpt

The idea for this new edition grew out of a number of requests from readers of Going Wild who wanted to know "what happened." Nearly a decade has passed since the first deer hunt in 1991, and the forest has responded much as the MDC foresters had predicted: young saplings are popping up and are less subject to the nibbling of deer, though regeneration is still less than the MDC foresters had hoped for. The cumulative impact of deer overpopulation on the reservation might well have been underestimated, much like the size of the herd seems to have been. But all else equal, the fate of the Quabbin watershed is no doubt more secure now than it was ten years ago.

Of course, "all else" is rarely equal. Managing natural resources is growing steadily more difficult, and managing the Quabbin is no exception. For all the grief the MDC took and still takes over the hunt, nibbling deer may well prove more manageable than humans who want to nibble in their own ways. The greatest challenge on the horizon is coming, paradoxically, from the Environmental Protection Agency. The EPA has ruled that federal clean water standards require that a multimillion dollar filtration plant be installed to process the water flowing to Boston. The MDC is contesting the order and the matter is pending in the courts.

Should the EPA prevail (and it is hard to see how, in the long run, it will not), the MDC's major justification for sharply restricting access to the Quabbin will be severely weakened. The MDC has been able to forestall all sorts of requests for access by insisting, with plenty of . . .

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