Studies in German Literature in Honor of Alexander Rudolph Hohlfeld

Studies in German Literature in Honor of Alexander Rudolph Hohlfeld

Studies in German Literature in Honor of Alexander Rudolph Hohlfeld

Studies in German Literature in Honor of Alexander Rudolph Hohlfeld

Excerpt

There is a great ferment in the educational world today, and not only the aims and methods of teaching, but also the personality and effectiveness of the teacher, are being subjected to an extraordinary amount of critical attention. It will be admitted by all candid observers that there is too much ineffective teaching, partly because so many of our educators fail to put their instructional work where it rightly belongs, in the forefront of their interests and their activities. It is with all the more pleasure and satisfaction therefore, that the compilers of this volume, in giving concrete expression to their esteem for their teacher and colleague, A. R. Hohlfeld, at the same time call to public attention the devoted and self-sacrificing academic labors which have consumed so many of the best years of his life.

When Professor W. H. Rosenstengel, senior professor of the department of German at the University of Wisconsin, was suddenly stricken down in the fall of 1900, the university authorities seized upon this opportunity to give the German department a leadership commensurate with their ambitions for the institution as a whole. A. R. Hohlfeld was then teaching at Vanderbilt University, and despite his youth had already made an enviable name for himself in scholarly circles. When the call to Wisconsin came to him, it was to him both a challenge and a dream-fulfilment. At once he saw clearly marked out before him the path which he has followed with unwavering resolution. Without neglecting the undergraduate field, he would establish a type of graduate work that should compare favorably with the best that is done at German universities. Surrounding himself with able men and women, he would strive for the improved training of future academic instructors, both at this and other collegiate institutions. And in all his activities, the welfare and advancement of the student, whether graduate or undergraduate, should be the first and foremost consideration.

The success which attended the gradual development of this admirable plan is well known to all who are acquainted with the history of German instruction in the last quarter-century. The steadily increasing student enrolments at the University of Wiscon sin . . .

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