The Dicts and Sayings of the Philosophers: The Translations

The Dicts and Sayings of the Philosophers: The Translations

The Dicts and Sayings of the Philosophers: The Translations

The Dicts and Sayings of the Philosophers: The Translations

Excerpt

This edition of the Dicts and Sayings of the Philosophers was begun in the spring of 1932, and the final manuscript, with the exception of the Glossary and the Index of Names, was delivered to the Early English Text Society in the summer of 1936. The increasingly heavy demands on my time have been the chief cause for the further delay in the publication of the volume.

In 1936 a privately printed edition of Scrope's text only was issued by Dr. Margaret Schofield as a dissertation for the University of Pennsylvania. It was not till some time later, when my text was already in page-proofs and the corrected galleys for the Introduction and Notes had been returned to the Early English Text Society, that Dr. Schofield kindly sent me a copy of her dissertation. By that time it was too late to profit by the results of her researches. Unfortunate as it undoubtedly is that two editions of Scrope's translation should appear at so short an interval, it is nevertheless gratifying to note that, with the obvious exception of the Text itself, Dr. Schofield and I have not covered the same ground. In addition, as far as the Text is concerned, Dr. Schofield was not aware of the existence of the Emmanuel College MS., nor did she print the abbreviated version here included in the Appendix. Limitations of space, brought about by the printing of the anonymous translation on the facingpages of the Scrope text, prevented my including the variant readings of the two corrupt manuscripts preserved in the British Museum; it is fortunate that these may be found in Dr. Schofield's dissertation and the two editions thus supplement each other. In Dr. Schofield's Introduction, Scrope's life is given in detail, and, in the Notes, chief emphasis has been placed on the identity of the philosophers whose sayings are the subject-matter of the book; with neither of these aspects have I concerned myself.

I desire particularly to thank Lord Tollemache not only for depositing his manuscript at the British Museum for my use but also for permitting the text to be printed here. For so generously placing their material at my disposal, I am obliged to the authorities of the British Museum, Bibliothéque Nationale, Bodleian Library, Cambridge University Library, Lambeth Palace Library, Royal Library at Copenhagen, the Pierpont Morgan Library, and . . .

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