American Regionalism: A Cultural-Historical Approach to National Integration

American Regionalism: A Cultural-Historical Approach to National Integration

American Regionalism: A Cultural-Historical Approach to National Integration

American Regionalism: A Cultural-Historical Approach to National Integration

Excerpt

American regionalism attempts to present a general picture of contemporary regionalism in the United States interpreted in the light of its historical and theoretical backgrounds. The book has grown logically out of "the day's work" and therefore reflects the limitation of the workshop product. Parts I and III are the outgrowth of many years of regional study and exploration, more particularly in the Southeast and the Southwest, but comparatively also in the Middle States and the Far West with some first-hand observations in all of the six major regions. Part II is the result of the more recent recognition of the rich and undeveloped field of the historical and theoretical backgrounds of regionalism and of the importance of historical evidence in the testing of practical efforts.

This workshop nature of the book is apparent in both its general objectives and in the methods and procedures through which these objectives have been sought. For some time it has been clear that there was needed a working compendium of the extraordinary amount and variety of materials on regionalism to the end that clarification and unity of the great diversity of regional approaches might be attained. Such a compendium was needed, further, not only as inventory, but to serve as testing media for regional research and planning in the light of realistic situations. Another objective was to focus upon regionalism as a cultural-historical approach to national unity and to translate the older historical sectionalism into a dynamic doctrine of national development. It was desired further to explore the extent to which regionalism might serve not only as a tool for progress but as a medium for portraying the new pluralism of the American nation and for interpreting its growth through the orderly . . .

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