The British Attack on Unemployment

The British Attack on Unemployment

The British Attack on Unemployment

The British Attack on Unemployment

Excerpt

During the past five years of depression, individualistic America has faced the necessity for concerted action in many fields. Monetary and banking difficulties have given rise to many changes and controls; agricultural disequilibrium has resulted in striking experimentsi and industry and business have subjected themselves to controls hitherto undreamed of.

The process of bringing our complicated economic order into balance is necessarily a prolonged one. No reconstruction program can be successful unless during the period of transition the impoverished victims of economic malad justment are provided for. Accordingly, the rapid movement of affairs in Washington has been accompanied by the federal government's directing a considerable amount of its energy and funds to the relief of the millions who have lost their jobs, their homes, their savings. Billions of dollars have been devoted to public works, relief works, and outright cash grants.

Policies, unemployment relief, formulated in a period when a fourth of our working population has been unemployed, have unavoidably taken the form of emergency measures. More and more, however, the conclusion that no temporary plan will suffice is gaining ground. Whereas previously only a few have felt that permanent relief from the fear of joblessness should be accorded our workers, there is now a widespread conviction that some degree of security is essential to the proper functioning of our economic system. There is little doubt but that a permanent plan to protect workers from the ravages of enforced unemployment will shortly become integral part of our national policy.

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