The Theories of Claude Debussy: Musicien Francais

The Theories of Claude Debussy: Musicien Francais

The Theories of Claude Debussy: Musicien Francais

The Theories of Claude Debussy: Musicien Francais

Excerpt

Claude Debussy was no lover of publicity. He tells us himself that he never worried about what people said of his music. He went his way quietly, without seeking to advertise his theories. Nevertheless, in his riper years he frequently published his opinions on music. Sometimes these appeared from his own pen, in publications of the day; sometimes they were reproduced, more or less accurately, from interviews; for in spite of an instinctive repugnance, he could not always refuse importunate journalists.

It was late in the day when Debussy made his debut as a musical critic. He was close on forty when, in 1901, he became musical critic to the Revue Blanebe. He had not then made his mark as the composer of 'Pelléas et Mélisande'; and though he had already attracted the attention of musicians by such works as the 'PrU=00E9slude à l'aprU=00E8ss-midi d'un Faune' (1892), the String Quartet (1893), or the Chansons de Bilitis (1898), the general public looked upon him merely as a revolutionary. His compositions were appreciated only by a small group. The mocking tone and the paradoxical views of his critiques only served to increase his reputation as a disturbing if . . .

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