The Destiny of a Continent

The Destiny of a Continent

The Destiny of a Continent

The Destiny of a Continent

Excerpt

Manuel Ugarte, author of The Destiny of a Continent, is one of Latin America's most brilliant thinkers and writers. The son of Floro Ugarte and Sabina Rivero, he was born in Buenos Aires in 1878 and educated at the Colegio Nacional of his native Argentine. When barely twenty he left for Paris to complete his literary training and to seek his fame. He won almost immediate recognition among the élite of the French capital. In 1900-1901 he visited the United States and Mexico and became convinced that Latin America was in danger of being absorbed and dominated by the United States. He returned to France, where for the next decade he divided his time between pure literature and propaganda designed to arouse Europe and his compatriots of America against the Yankee Peril. He carried on his propaganda through numerous journals of France, Spain, and Italy, and, in 1910, he brought together his ideas on the subject in a volume published at Valencia under the title of The Future of Latin America. Soon afterwards he deserted his writing-table and mounted the platform with the view of more effectively warning his native land against the menaces which threatened both from within and from without. His first lecture was delivered in Barcelona on May 25, 1910. In October, 1911, he spoke at the Sorbonne, where he announced his intention of carrying his message throughout Latin America. During the next two years he addressed audiences in every capital of the Latin-American nations and again visited the United States, giving a lecture at Columbia University. At the invitation of President Carranza, he made his third journey to Mexico in 1917. Returning to Buenos Aires, he remained in his native republic until after the close of the World War, when an invitation from El Centro de Cultura Hispano-Americana, of Madrid, brought him once more to Spain. From Spain he proceeded to France, and the preface of the volume here presented in translation was written at Nice in July, 1923.

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.