Toward International Organization: A Series of Lectures at Oberlin College

Toward International Organization: A Series of Lectures at Oberlin College

Toward International Organization: A Series of Lectures at Oberlin College

Toward International Organization: A Series of Lectures at Oberlin College

Excerpt

The movement toward international organization, while compact of many motives, is essentially an endeavor to find a sure and lasting relief from the warfare that so repeatedly frustrates the effort of mankind to establish a way of life that may indeed be worth the living. As the physical and spiritual destructiveness of war becomes more tragic, so, in defense against that tragedy, the movement toward international organization gains in mass and in intensity. It is far stronger today than it was at any time during the first World War; and in its development lies our best, perhaps our only, hope for the future. It constitutes, therefore, a theme that may well challenge the attention of all thoughtful citizens.

The several lectures of the present series move from the past toward the future. Professor Robinson's introductory lecture reviews the surprisingly long and interesting series of efforts toward international organization made hitherto. The second and third lectures, by Professors Wooster and Lerner, deal with the question: "Why is it that we need international organization?" The answer is that without it we must needs continue to live in a state of perpetual conflict: the two lectures deal respectively with the economic and the political phases of that conflict. Major Eliot considers not the defense of an achieved international order, but the maintenance of order during the transition period . . .

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