Authority, Responsibility and Education

Authority, Responsibility and Education

Authority, Responsibility and Education

Authority, Responsibility and Education

Excerpt

This book was originally based upon talks delivered mainly on the Home Service and Third Programme of the BBC between April 1956 and January 1959. Most of them were also published in The Listener. They attracted wide attention in both England and the U.S. As a result the author was asked to go as Visiting Professor to the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 1961. From then onwards his interest in the philosophy of education grew and he was appointed to the chair in Philosophy of Education at the University of London Institute of Education in 1962.

In view of the continuing interest in these excursions into applied philosophy, which appeal both to the general reader and to students working for a variety of diplomas and certificates requiring an elementary knowledge of social philosophy and the philosophy of education, it was thought appropriate to bring out a revised edition of the book which takes account of the author's work in the philosophy of education over the past ten years. In order to do this the two extra-mural lectures on 'The Psychologist and the Teacher' and on '"Experience" and the Function of the Educator', which were added to the original broadcast talks, have been omitted. In their place have been substituted four new popular public lectures on contemporary themes, which the author has delivered during his occupancy of the chair of Philosophy of Education at London.

In some of the original talks the examples now seem a bit dated, for example certain references to films and to figures such as de Gaulle. But these do not affect the main lines of the argument which are as pertinent now as they were just over a decade ago. Indeed in some ways they seem more pertinent because of student unrest and attacks on authority, and because of the growing concern about moral education in a permissive society.

The author would like to acknowledge his indebtedness to J. Weltman and T. S. Gregory of the BBC, who helped him greatly with the original presentation of the talks for broadcasting, and to many contributors to the correspondence columns of The Listener . . .

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