The Collected Poems of Edith Sitwell

The Collected Poems of Edith Sitwell

The Collected Poems of Edith Sitwell

The Collected Poems of Edith Sitwell

Excerpt

These, poems were, with a few exceptions, written between the years 1920 and 1930. They are all that I care to preserve. Some of the poems--such early work, for instance, as the fragment from an unfinished play, calle "The Madness of Saul"---I have only kept for the sake of a few lines.

No critic can be more severely conscious of the faults in some of these poems than am I. The writing of poetry is at all times a difficult matter; but women poets are faced with even more difficulties than are men poets, since technique is very largely a matter of physique, and, in the past, with the exception of Christina Rossetti "Goblin Market," there has been no technically sufficient poem written by a woman.

The poems in "Façade," and some of the songs in "Prelude to a Fairy Tale," are technical experiments--studies in the effect that texture has on rhythm, and the effect that varying and elaborate patterns of rhymes and of assonances and dissonances have upon rhythm.

It only remains to be said that the book contains two new poems, "The Ghost whose Lips were Warm," and "The Lament of Edward Blastock." "The Hambone and the Heart" contains several new verses, and there is a new and changed ending to "Gold Coast Customs. . . ."

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