Medea

Medea

Medea

Medea

Synopsis


"It is the best text for this [graduate and advanced undergraduate] level I have ever encountered in many years of teaching Greek Tragedy."--Joseph F. Desmond,Tufts University
"An ideal introduction to reading Greek tragic texts. Remarkable range of assistance and information shrewdly deployed so students may take as much as they need."--Andrew Ford,Princeton University

Excerpt

This edition is designed for people who are inexperienced in reading Greek tragedy in the original. the play comes first: Euripides wrote it to be seen and heard for its own sake, not as material for analysis and research, and it is as a play that it has had and is still having its effects on people and on literature. With the Greek Text are the Notes, which contain both assistance in the understanding of the language, and other things which have to do with the Greek itself. Then there is the Commentary, designed to help the appreciation of the play. There is very little Greek in it. It is assumed that most people will have a translation of the play, and that many will not be able for various reasons to study all the Greek. But it would be disastrous if that meant failing to read the play as a whole with as much appreciation as possible. Then there is the 'Periegesis'. This word is the title of several ancient travel books, which gave brief accounts of some interesting places, for the benefit of people who might wish to go and see them for themselves: I cannot think what else to call the section. It tries to suggest rather than answer some of the many questions which the play prompts, and collects the relevant evidence from the Commentary. Reference is often made in the Commentary and Periegesis to passages in the Oxford Book of Greek Verse (OBGV), which is also published in translation. Finally there is the Vocabulary, which cannot be used effectively without reading the guide at its beginning.

This is not an edition for the learned. It inevitably has to simplify what is complicated, and fails even to raise many questions of importance, particularly about the text and the metre. I hope it does not offend too much against the work of scholars, or pretend to solve problems which have not . . .

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