The Physiological Basis of Physical Education and Athletics

The Physiological Basis of Physical Education and Athletics

The Physiological Basis of Physical Education and Athletics

The Physiological Basis of Physical Education and Athletics

Excerpt

We have written this text for the physical educator and coach. The primary purpose has been to present those essential materials that will help to ensure the safe conduct of sport and physical education programs. A secondary purpose has been to approach this body of knowledge from a practical standpoint. We have attempted to accomplish this by showing direct applications of the concepts to practical problems that occur on the playing fields and in the gymnasia. Those students with little background in chemistry and physics should not be handicapped. On the other hand, those with competence in the basic science area should find new challenges in the application of their science background to the problems encountered in physical education and athletics.

As in many other fields, a number of old wives' tales are handed down from one generation to the next -- a few harmless, some tragic. All should be dispensed with. For example: (1) the boy who lifts weights will become muscle bound; (2) swimmers should not exercise with weights; (3) don't allow water on the playing field; and (4) give salt tablets freely, but withhold water. The latter is especially unfortunate and has precipitated tragedies in sports. The materials covered in this text should allow the student to know the scientific or physiological reasons why he does certain things -- not simply because his coach before him did it that way.

DONALD K. MATHEWS EDWARD L. FOX

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