Ring Lardner: A Biography

Ring Lardner: A Biography

Ring Lardner: A Biography

Ring Lardner: A Biography

Excerpt

At the height of his fame in the middle twenties Ring Lardner was known as a humorist, a newspaper columnist, and a writer of brilliant short stories; but to millions of his wide audience he was first of all a baseball reporter. His passion for the game began early in his childhood in Niles, Michigan, where he had every chance to gratify it. His father often took the Lardner children to big-league games in Chicago; Ring and his brother Rex drove the Lardner horse and buggy to South Bend to see the games of the Central League and the Notre Dame varsity team; and there were many semiprofessional teams around Niles. The Lardner boys followed national baseball closely in the newspapers, they worked on baseball statistics in the schoolroom, and when they sang in the choir of Trinity Church, they carried the Sunday sports pages folded under their vestments to read during the sermon. At one time Ring was intended for the ministry, but apparently his interest in sports superseded whatever vocation he was thought to have.

The other passion of his youth was music, but he was never to have any conspicuous professional success in that field. Baseball was the springboard to his ultimate achievement in journalism and fiction. The game was somewhat rustic in Niles in Ring's childhood, but by the time he graduated from high school at the age of sixteen, he probably knew the game as well as a professional reporter. It had not occurred to him yet to become a newspaperman; that happened almost by accident. After a brief and unenthusiastic attempt at higher education and four years of footless employment around . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.