The Eclogues and Georgics of Virgil

The Eclogues and Georgics of Virgil

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The Eclogues and Georgics of Virgil

The Eclogues and Georgics of Virgil

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Excerpt

ECLOGUE I. -- TITYRUS.

MELIBOEUS. TITYRUS.

M. -- Tityrus, thou where thou liest under the covert of spreading beech, broodest on thy slim pipe over the Muse of the woodland: we leave our native borders and pleasant fields; we fly our native land, while thou, Tityrus, at ease in the shade teachest the woods to echo fair Amaryllis.

T. -- O Meliboeus, a god brought us this peace: for a god ever will he be to me: his altar a tender lamb from our sheepfolds shall often stain. He granted that my oxen might stray as thou descriest, and myself play what I would on the rustic reed.

M. -- I envy not, I, rather I wonder, so is all the country-side being routed out. See, I myself wearily drive forth my she-goats; and this one, Tityrus, I just drag along: for here among the hazel thickets she has borne twins, the hope of the flock, and left them, alas! on the naked flints. Often, had a mind not infatuate been mine, I remember how lightning-scathed oaks presaged this woe of ours. But yet vouchsafe to us, Tityrus, who is this god of thine.

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