The Crisis of American Labor

The Crisis of American Labor

The Crisis of American Labor

The Crisis of American Labor

Excerpt

THE LATE DANIEL TOBIN, FORMER PRESIDENT OF THE TEAMsters' Union, recalled in a moment of nostalgia a few years ago that he and the president before him used to sleep in the same bed in a $2.50-a-week hotel room to save the union money. Andrew Furuseth, head of the Sailors' Union at the turn of the century, lived an ascetic existence in a tiny room most of his life. On one occasion when he was arrested for picketing, he told the judge that he had no fear of going to jail because "there is no cell humbler than the room in which I live, no prison food any worse than what I'm accustomed to."John Fitzpatrick, president of the Chicago Federation of Labor, was usually to be seen at lunch spreading out the sandwiches prepared for him by his wife.

There were other union leaders, even a few decades ago, who had already lost their sense of devotion and their identification with the humble workingman, but the tradition of self-sacrifice and selfless service is deeply rooted in the . . .

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