The New Populism

The New Populism

The New Populism

The New Populism

Excerpt

I grew up in Oklahoma during the Depression years, the 1930s. Franklin Roosevelt's background was radically different from that of my sharecropping, common-labor family.

Yet we identified with Roosevelt. More than that, we revered him. I think of his voice first--on the radio. We watched the radio in those days. We didn't just listen. We sat around it and watched the radio, and we often heard Franklin Roosevelt's voice--reassuring, hopeful.

Later, I saw his face in newsreels--confident, determined, jolly. He was busy. He was doing things; he was changing things. And God knows we needed things done and things changed.

There was no need to waste your time telling us of any flaws in his program. We didn't want to hear it. We did not believe it. (We didn't even believe he was crippled. My mind told me he was, but I am still shocked today to see pictures that actually show it.) . . .

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