Acupuncture: A Viable Medical Alternative

Acupuncture: A Viable Medical Alternative

Acupuncture: A Viable Medical Alternative

Acupuncture: A Viable Medical Alternative

Synopsis

"It will be an eye opener for the public to see that acupuncture is widely practiced and that research in this area is going on . . . all over the world . . . It has been proven many times . . . that acupuncture can work in many cases where conventional medicine has failed." Nelly Tsiving, licensed acupuncturist Throughout history, acupuncture has provided painless, low-cost, non-invasive relief for conditions ranging from back pain and headaches to cancer and AIDS. As Americans seek viable, cost-effective health care alternatives, the benefits of acupuncture are gaining new respect in the West. In this guide, Marie Cargill, a licensed acupuncturist, de-mystifies acupuncture, explaining: * how and why acupuncture works * how acupuncture is effective in most major medical specializations * what you can expect from a visit to the acupuncturist Detailed, direct, and easy-to-follow, Acupuncture will persuade skeptics of the potential for this effective approach to healing.

Excerpt

I am a practitioner of Oriental medicine. In China, I would be called "Doctor Cargill"; in the United States I am not permitted to use that title. When I fulfilled the requirements for being licensed to practice acupuncture in Massachusetts, I agreed not to call myself "doctor." It seems a small matter, but it reflects a view held by many Americans that only practitioners of Western medicine are worthy of the name. Such preconceptions help to keep Americans unaware that acupuncture, in combination with herbal medicine, can restore and maintain health. If these medical resources were widely available, patients and their insurance companies would no longer have to spend vast sums of money for hospitals, surgery, and medication. Acupuncture can alleviate prolonged pain, discomfort, and anxiety, and end severe dependence on a medical system so huge and impersonal that each patient feels like a forgotten cog in a machine.

I'm an American, born and reared in the United States. It may seem odd that I choose to practice another country's medicine. I might have taken the same path that hundreds of American women take every year and simply have entered medical school. I will tell you why I chose not to.

Initially, I had no leaning toward medicine. In high school I wasn't . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.