They Don't Dance Much

They Don't Dance Much

They Don't Dance Much

They Don't Dance Much

Synopsis

Called by Raymond Chandler "a sleazy, corrupt but completely believable story of a North Carolina town," this tough, realistic novel exemplifies Depression literature in the United States.

Falling somewhere between the hard-as-nails writing of James M. Cain and the early stories of Ernest Hemingway, James Ross's novel was for sheer brutality and frankness of language considerably ahead of his reading public's taste for realism untinged with sentiment or profundity. In his brilliant Afterword to this new edition, George V. Higgins, author of the recent best-seller Cogan's Trade,pays tribute to Ross for his courage in telling his story truthfully, in all its ugliness.

The setting of They Don ' t Dance Much is a roadhouse on the outskirts of a North Carolina town on the border with South Carolina, complete with dance floor, restaurant, gambling room, and cabins rented by the hour. In the events described, Smut Milligan, the proprietor, seeks money to keep operating and commits a brutal murder.

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