Fields of Psychology

Fields of Psychology

Fields of Psychology

Fields of Psychology

Excerpt

Frequently the second course in psychology for students in colleges of liberal arts is in the nature of a survey of the fields of psychology. This seems very appropriate, especially for those students who will complete only two semesters of psychology, and for whom it is important to learn of the varied role that psychology is playing in shaping modern thinking, and how its applications ramify throughout the whole range of human endeavor. There is no better way in which an enlightened appreciation of a subject can be imparted. Such a course is appropriate also for those students who are undecided as to a possible concentration in psychology, in that it should give them a better basis for making a decision. For those who may have decided upon psychology as their field of concentration, it should serve to guide them into the special fields that are most appealing to their temperaments and purposes. A recent study of opinion among industrial psychologists revealed a very general agreement that a course on the several fields would serve as an excellent orientation for the graduate student.

While there have been several textbooks written by single authors for such a course, the editor feels that psychology is now so specialized that it is difficult for one writer to survey adequately the significant developments in all the fields. The interpretation of a field to the student can best be accomplished by a writer who is himself immersed in that field. He then writes as an intimate insider rather than as an appraising outsider. His feeling for the right emphases, unless he is a one-sided worker in that field, can seldom be matched by that of an outsider. For these and other reasons, the editor believes that the textbook for this course should be in the nature of a symposium, written by contributors who have shown by their previous writings that they are very much at home in their respective fields.

The order of the chapters in this volume is somewhat arbitrary. They may be taught in almost any preferred sequence. The adopted sequence places the main theoretical fields first, beginning with the developmental approach. The chapters on differential psychology end . . .

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