Geology and Allied Sciences: A Thesaurus and a Coordination of English and German Specific and General Terms

Geology and Allied Sciences: A Thesaurus and a Coordination of English and German Specific and General Terms

Geology and Allied Sciences: A Thesaurus and a Coordination of English and German Specific and General Terms

Geology and Allied Sciences: A Thesaurus and a Coordination of English and German Specific and General Terms

Excerpt

I submit GEOLOGY AND ALLIED SCIENCES to the scientific world with the sincere hope that this Thesaurus may fill a gap in the international geologic literature. Such a gap is the lack of a comprehensive and up-to-date thesaurus of geologic terms in any of our modern languages, to say nothing of the absence of a complete coordination of corresponding terms in two or more languages. There can be no doubt that this deficiency has handicapped the international work of correlation toward a general synthesis of geologic research work. Therefore, I have set myself the task of coordinating the American and English with the German terminology as an important basis for an international exchange of geologic knowledge. I hope that this first decisive step may lead toward an ideal encyclopedic consolidation of all geologic and allied terms.The American, British and German literature has been widely considered and special attention has been given to peculiarities of local use of terms in both languages as they are found in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and South America, in Africa, India, and Australia, in Great Britain, in Germany and the rest of Europe. Therefore, for the first time in geologic literature, this Thesaurus with its more than twenty-five thousand entries in each language presents a practically complete collection and coordination of German and English specific and general terms.I have endeavored to adhere strictly to the terms in actual use, even if, as not infrequently happens, they are used incorrectly or confusingly. In each instance the misleading term has been so indicated. In some cases, however, I have had to correct obvious mistakes or carelessness, perpetuated by way of habit, as may be seen when the entries Schneesturm, Versteinerung and Versteinung, are consulted.Furthermore, there is a wide-spread confusion regarding the meaning and position of the following stratigraphical levels: Lower Cambrian, Middle Cambrian, Upper Cambrian, Lower Silurian, Upper Silurian, Champlainic, Ontaric, Ordovician, Gotlandian, Untersilur, Obersilur, Ordovizium. These century-old discrepancies I thought best to eliminate by giving at the end of the book (p. 404) a table showing the various levels in their historical development and their proper coordination as indicated in the last column of this table. For the purpose of clarification only, I have deviated somewhat from the common usage without, however, proposing a new or even modified nomenclature.The practical completeness, not only in mere number of terms, but comprehensiveness as to the inherent scope of geology, has been one of my goals. For this reason, besides Geology proper, the following allied sciences have been considered in proportion to their relationship to geology: . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.