The Enemy Within: The High Cost of Living near Nuclear Reactors: Breast Cancer, AIDS, Low Birthweights, and Other Radiation-Induced Immune Deficiency Effects

The Enemy Within: The High Cost of Living near Nuclear Reactors: Breast Cancer, AIDS, Low Birthweights, and Other Radiation-Induced Immune Deficiency Effects

The Enemy Within: The High Cost of Living near Nuclear Reactors: Breast Cancer, AIDS, Low Birthweights, and Other Radiation-Induced Immune Deficiency Effects

The Enemy Within: The High Cost of Living near Nuclear Reactors: Breast Cancer, AIDS, Low Birthweights, and Other Radiation-Induced Immune Deficiency Effects

Synopsis

Recent research in the UK has shown that living near high tension electrical cables can increase the incidence of cancer and leukemia. From the US comes The Enemy Within, which provides evidence of the dangers of living near nuclear reactors.

Excerpt

After a long and productive career as an economic and statistical consultant to many public and private agencies, in recent years I switched my professional focus to exploring the health effects of environmental abuses, including low-level radiation. Because of its politically sensitive nature, some may find this a puzzling change, but in reviewing my professional career over a span of 50 years, I can discern a logical progression of events that has finally led to this change of focus. Whatever success I have had resulted from several fortuitous incidents that beneficially changed the course of my life, and which may explain how I came to write this book.

Although I had majored in mathematics at college, when I came to do my graduate work at Columbia University in the late 1930s, I switched to economic statistics. I was inspired by a truly charismatic teacher--Professor Wesley Clair Mitchell. Probably the greatest of all American economists, Mitchell founded the National Bureau of Economic Research after World War I. At that time, he was head of the War Production Board, which made evident the United States' need to develop such modern statistical measures as the national income accounts and the time series required to trace the changing course of the American business cycle.

Each of Mitchell's famous lectures on the development of economic thought were attended by as many as 200 students from all parts of the world. The most popular "text" at that time was a mimeographed set of "Mitchell's Lecture Notes," a stenographic transcription of his 1933 lectures. After the war I edited the lecture notes with Mitchell's blessing, and they ultimately emerged as part of . . .

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