Analysis of the Interchurch World Movement Report on the Steel Strike

Analysis of the Interchurch World Movement Report on the Steel Strike

Analysis of the Interchurch World Movement Report on the Steel Strike

Analysis of the Interchurch World Movement Report on the Steel Strike

Excerpt

No question at the present day is of greater interest to the public than that of the relations between employers and their working men. Not only are these two parties interested but the public in many cases loses even more in both financial interests and lack of comfort and public facilities than do either of the parties immediately concerned in the case of a great strike, which suspends an important business like railroading, coal raining, manufacture of steel, the furnishing of milk to a great city, and other similar industries. In consequence the story of a great strike, with its causes and allotment of fault and the results both to the parties directly interested and to the public, is of general concern. And such a story, if it is to do good rather than harm, must be told with absolute impartiality and complete regard for the exact truth. When the Interchurch World Movement was organized, most people interested in social and moral progress hoped earnestly for its success. It is generally recognized that no other organization in the civilized world is of so great importance in promoting the welfare of society as a whole as the Christian Church, including all of the various denominations. It was in consequence the earnest desire of public-spirited men that the work be conducted . . .

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