Tamed Frontiers: Economy, Society, and Civil Rights in Upper Amazonia

Tamed Frontiers: Economy, Society, and Civil Rights in Upper Amazonia

Tamed Frontiers: Economy, Society, and Civil Rights in Upper Amazonia

Tamed Frontiers: Economy, Society, and Civil Rights in Upper Amazonia

Synopsis

Santos-Granero (Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama) and Barclay (Facultad Latino American de Ciencias Sociales-Sede, Ecuador) tell the story of major changes in the political economy, rural landscape, and civil society of Loreto, the northern portion of Peruvian Amazonia. They begin in 1851 when the Amazon river was opened to international navigation, and proceed to the 1990s and the shift to a deregulation political paradigm and a peace treaty with Ecuador. Central to their analysis are shifts in the modes of state intervention, the activities of the urban and rural elites, and the composition of the rural population. They include several photographs from the turn of the century.
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