Cahier de Georges Braque, 1917-1947

Cahier de Georges Braque, 1917-1947

Cahier de Georges Braque, 1917-1947

Cahier de Georges Braque, 1917-1947

Excerpt

2 Nature does not give a taste for perfection. We conceive it neither better nor worse.

3 We shall never be at rest. The present is perpetual. Thinking is one thing, reasoning another.

4 Reality It is not enough to make people see what we paint. We must also make them want to touch.

5 Art is a mode of representation .

6 Emotion is neither added nor imitated. It is the bud, the work is the blossoming.

7 In art there is no effect without twisting the truth. Those who come up behind: the pure, the intact, the blind, the eunuchs. I don't do as I like, I do as I can.

8 The personality of the artist is not made up of the ensemble of his peculiarities.

9 The artist should not be asked for more than lie can give, nor the critic for more than he can see. Let us be satisfied to evoke reflection, let us not try to convince.

10 Art is meant to disturb, science reassures. By the grace of God, says one. The other says: God is with us, and the third: God and my Right.

11 The painter thinks in forms and colors, the object is the poetics.

12 We should not imitate what we want to create .

13 There is only one thing in art that has value: that which one can not explain.

14 If the painter does not scorn painting, let him beware of doing a painting that may be worth more than himself.

15 The artist is not misunderstood, he is undiscovered. They exploit him without knowing that it is he.

16 Those who forge ahead turn their backs on the followers. That is all that the followers deserve.

17 The Hunt

18 I like the rule that corrects the emotion .

19 Science is never without a certain amount of fraud: in order to solve a problem it is enough to have stated it well. Art soars, science provides crutches.

20 It is the precariousness of the work that sets up the artist as a hero. When one relies upon talent, it means that the drive is weakening.

22 The painter does not try to reconstruct an anecdote but to construct a pictorial fact.

23 There is art of the people and art for the people, the latter invented by intellectuals. I do not think that when Beethoven or Bach was inspired by popular tunes it occurred to them to set up a hierarchy.

24 Unable to adapt an outmoded vocabulary, the critic condemns.

25 I am far more concerned about being in tune with nature than copyng it.

26 To discover a thing is to skin it .

27 Climate A certain temperature must be reached which makes things malleable.

28 The pre-classical style is a style of discontinuity, the classical style is a style of development: Mont Saint-Michel and Versailles - Villon and Madame de Sévigné.

29 Every age limits its aspirations. From which springs, along with complicity, the illusion of progress.

30 The common is true, the similar is false. Trouillebert resembles Corot, but they have nothing in common.

31 Writing is not describing, painting is not depicting. Verisimilitude is only an optical illusion.

32 For every acquisition there is a corresponding loss. This is the law of compensation.

33 Limited means beget new forms, invite to creation, make the style. Progress in art does not lie in extending its limits, but in knowing them better.

34 I am not a revolutionary painter. I am not seeking exaltation. Fervor is enough for me.

35 To define a thing is to substitute the definition for the thing.

36 To construct is to assemble homogeneous elements. To build is to unite heterogeneous elements.

37 Impreanation Obsession Hallucination

38 All things considered, I prefer those who exploit me to those who follow me. The former have something to teach me.

39 Any state is always complementary to the state that preceded it.

40 Survival does not destroy the memory .

41 One can turn a river from its course but not send it back to its source.

42 Ideas, like clothes, wear out and lose their shape with use.

43 Action is a succession of hopeless acts which enable us to remain hopeful.

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