The Sixth Book of the Aeneid

The Sixth Book of the Aeneid

The Sixth Book of the Aeneid

The Sixth Book of the Aeneid

Excerpt

Of the many debts which I, like all modern editors of Vergil, owe to the work of countless predecessors, those which I would specially desire to acknowledge are to the earliest and the latest of our commentators. Servius, even admitting his palpable deficiencies, has provided the foundation for all later work, and has received less than his due. Norden's elaborate and erudite edition of the Sixth Book has raised many new points and provided fresh illustrative matter. The fact that I find myself in strong disagreement with many of his conclusions, and that his methods too often appear to me radically unsound, scarcely lessens my obligation. There is one other commentator whom I should wish to mention as having a special claim upon the gratitude of all students of Vergil--namely, the Spaniard La Cerda, whose influence on subsequent commentaries has been profound. To the other great Vergilian scholars I would express my indebtedness comprehensively and in general terms. Of books not directly connected with Vergil I owe much to Dieterich's Nekyia, which is a model in point of form to all writers on such subjects; while, over and above the wider obligations under which Mr. Warde . . .

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