Franz Rosenzweig and Jehuda Halevi: Translating, Translations, and Translators

Franz Rosenzweig and Jehuda Halevi: Translating, Translations, and Translators

Franz Rosenzweig and Jehuda Halevi: Translating, Translations, and Translators

Franz Rosenzweig and Jehuda Halevi: Translating, Translations, and Translators

Synopsis

Galli's primary aim is to explore Rosenzweig's statement that his notes to Halevi's poems exemplify a practical application of the philosophic system he set out in The Star of Redemption. Through an extended, multifaceted investigation of Rosenzweig's thought, Galli uncovers his philosophy of translation, out of which she determines and unravels his philosophic conclusion and his belief that there is only one language. In the final chapters, she concentrates on the notes to the poems, and in doing so attempts to philosophize according to Rosenzweig's own mandate: full speech is word and response.

Excerpt

This book comprises two parts. Each constitutes a stage in a response to Franz Rosenzweig's philosophy of speech-thinking, and each also attempts to remain within the speech-thinking method itself. the cue for the first stage, translating, began with Rosenzweig's own direct prompting. in Das neue Denken, the supplementary essay to The Star of Redemption, Rosenzweig states that his Notes to the poetry of Jehuda Halevi provide an example of the practical application of his philosophic method, speech-thinking. the investigation of this directive proved irresistible for one whose interest in the Star deepens with the passing years, and who repeatedly returns to its endless riches.

Part one of this book offers the first English translation of the 1927 edition of Rosenzweig's Halevi book. Through translating, that is to say through the use of Rosenzweig's own words through translation, I seek to present to English readers what Rosenzweig was doing philosophically and religiously. Thus part one is not by me, but by Franz Rosenzweig. I have tried to give to the reader Rosenzweig's own words by literally and laboriously following his own speech word by word, and to speak it through a new language.

For the Afterword and the Notes I accept responsibility as translator. the poems, which I find myself incapable of translating in the first place, are untranslatable also on philosophical grounds. Only translations of originals are permitted and possible. Also Rosenzweig, as he makes clear in the Afterword, and in his remarks on the translations at the conclusion of each note, while far from construing himself as a free renderer, does occasionally introduce a word or phrase for reasons of rhyme or metre. As well, he actually from time to time even alters the content, in order to retain the contours and the spirit of the verse, and all the while, rightly I would argue, defends himself as a true translator. the problem of the untranslatability of a translation is, of . . .

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