The Portuguese Military and the State: Rethinking Transitions in Europe and Latin America

The Portuguese Military and the State: Rethinking Transitions in Europe and Latin America

The Portuguese Military and the State: Rethinking Transitions in Europe and Latin America

The Portuguese Military and the State: Rethinking Transitions in Europe and Latin America

Excerpt

Since one of the objectives in writing this book has been to bring into focus 20 years of research on Portugal--published in a variety of articles, chapters, and edited books--it is appropriate to begin by acknowledging the fact that this research has been greatly facilitated by contact, discussion, and debate with other scholars in Portugal and in the United States. While there are many, many people with whom I have interacted over the years in going to and from Portugal, my understanding and love for things Portuguese is due first of all to colleagues in Portugal. Among them specific mention should be made of Mário Bacalhau, Manuel Braga da Cruz, António Barreto, Manuel Villaverde Cabral, Manuel de Lucena, António Costa Pinto, and José Blanco. In the United States four individuals stand out: Miguel Bensaude, Thomas Bruneau, Stanley Payne, and Douglas Wheeler. I also would like to thank Suzanne Colwell, Department of Government, at The University of Texas at Austin for her help with preparing this project for publication.

However, in acknowledging the gratitude I owe these people for support, especially at times when it has been difficult professionally to sustain an interest in Portugal within the United States, none of the ideas or interpretations included herein should be attributed to them. The interpretations made and the conclusions reached are entirely my own. I have endeavored to be succinct in my interpretation of Portuguese affairs to see if I might elicit the interest of others, busy with their own pursuits and agendas, so that they might pause for a moment and consider what has been going on in contemporary Portugal.

The years entailed in getting from 1971, when I first travelled to Portugal, to 1992 coincide with events in Portugal which provide insight into and an understanding of a broader world in transition during the 1970s and the 1980s and which transcend the experience of any one particular national community. While a great deal has been written on . . .

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