The Political Economy of Mexico: Two Studies

The Political Economy of Mexico: Two Studies

The Political Economy of Mexico: Two Studies

The Political Economy of Mexico: Two Studies

Excerpt

These two studies share as a common theme the saga of Revolutionary Mexico and its economic progress. Yet this is not the only bond that unites them either in nature or in purpose. For both authors, the study of contemporary Mexico is not an end in itself but rather a focus which is justified by the pertinence of this setting to the examination of certain problems of interest to the social scientist.

Both of these studies are experiments in the use of interdisciplinary approaches as a way of getting at some of the basic problems of economic development. For Glade, the Mexican Revolution appears as a tapestry, intricately woven of many strands: philosophical, political, artistic, economic. His study, marshaling evidence from the anthropologist, social psychologist, political scientist, and novelist, is an attempt to reproduce something of the design of that revolutionary tapestry and to trace its bearing on the economic process. For Anderson, Mexico's unusual system of public credit institutions provides an opportunity for a sortie into the vast no man's land that separates the traditional concerns of economists and political scientists. His study is an effort to view these economic institutions as part of the political system of the Mexican nation.

For both of the authors, the study of Mexico's economic progress would seem to offer lessons for the student of economic development. Out of a setting and sharing of problems much like those shared by many underdeveloped nations, Mexico has grown and modernized to the point where many now doubt the . . .

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