Readings in Biological Science

Readings in Biological Science

Readings in Biological Science

Readings in Biological Science

Excerpt

According to the late Dr. A. C. Kinsey (Methods in Biology, 1937), biology courses should be more than a succession of pickled worms and dead cats, of microscopic preparations and dried fungi, or a parade of technical names for nerves and muscles of unfamiliar creatures. Two of the most important functions of biology, he continued, should be to interest the student in the world in which he lives and to equip him with the scientific method for interpreting that world. Another way of stating these ideas is to say that, in the introductory course, facts may not be as important as the interest developed. To aid in the creation of interest, many new devices have appeared upon the market such as overhead projectors, single concept films, better charts and models, and a vast number of books.

The second edition of this book, like the first edition, attempts to place within the students' reach articles of great value which would not ordinarily be encountered. Many of the fine articles of the first edition have been replaced with those detailing the accomplishments of the second half of the twentieth century, including new data on photosynthesis, respiration, protein synthesis, space biology, and heredity. The new material does not supplant the old but only expands its perimeters; it is both supplementary and explanatory.

As in the first edition, we have had the cooperation of numerous editors and scientists and to these kind people, we extend our warmest thanks.

I. W. K.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.