Psychology in Community Settings: Clinical, Educational, Vocational, Social Aspects

Psychology in Community Settings: Clinical, Educational, Vocational, Social Aspects

Psychology in Community Settings: Clinical, Educational, Vocational, Social Aspects

Psychology in Community Settings: Clinical, Educational, Vocational, Social Aspects

Excerpt

It has been noted time and again in the course of history that wars produce profound effects on the societies involved. World War II has proved to be no exception to the rule. There is scarcely an aspect of our society that does not reflect our involvement in the last war. For example, the issues and problems with which we are confronted in education, race relations, population growth, and governmental responsibility reflect social processes that were either exacerbated or produced by World War II. That the lives of the millions of individuals who directly or indirectly participated in the war effort were forever affected in large or small ways needs no documentation. What tends to be forgotten or overlooked is that the effects on the war generation had consequences not only for the lives of subsequent generations but for governmental policy and action that by their nature produced further consequences for everyone. Nowhere is this more clear than in the mental-health field.

With America's involvement in the war two problems came to the fore with compelling urgency. The first and most immediate problem was to anticipate and plan for the care of a staggering number of individuals who would become one or another kind of casualty during the course of the war. The second problem was to plan for the enormous increase in facilities that would be required if the government was to discharge its legal and moral responsibilities honorably to veterans in the postwar period. Involved were hundreds of thousands of individuals and billions of dollars, and a large portion of each would be concerned with the treatment and care of psychiatric casualties. The difficulty of the problem was not made easier by the speed necessary for planning and action. (It should be said at this point that however much we may regret some of the consequences of what was done, the . . .

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