Hippocrates: Places in Man

Hippocrates: Places in Man

Hippocrates: Places in Man

Hippocrates: Places in Man

Synopsis

The wide-ranging content of Places in Man represents the entire Hippocratic Corpus: anatomy, physiology, pathology, medical ideology, clinical instruction, traditional love, gynaecology. Despite this wide and varied scope, the work is conceptually coherent and stylistically consistent. In this new edition of the Greek text with translation and commentary, the language and content of the work are studied in relation to other treatises of the Hippocratic Corpus, and to fragmentary early medical writings (both Presocratics and texts of Anonymus Londinensis). It is argued that while there are "Koan" and "Knidian" elements, a West Greek origin is probable; and that this may be the earliest work in the Corpus.

Excerpt

In 1993 I was awarded a Wellcome Trust research leave fellowship for one year, to work on Hippocratic anatomical treatises. That event changed my life. The brief respite from arduous duties in teaching and administration, combined with some long overdue research leave, proved so attractive that I sought early retirement from the University of St Andrews, Scotland; but now, having completed this book, I am taking up a post in Kyoto University, Japan. I am very grateful to the director and trustees of the Wellcome Trust for their generous support. The time I spent at the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine in London was enjoyable as well as productive. Thanks are due to the staff there for creating such a congenial working environment. The library staff were particularly helpful; to them, and to the staff of St Andrews University Library, I am grateful.

From start to finish in this research, I have benefited greatly from the assistance of Professor Vivian Nutton (Wellcome Institute for History of Medicine and University College London): I am indebted to him for vital bibliographical information, much guidance on the later medical tradition, and above all for incisive comments on, and trenchant criticisms of, drafts of this work. I am grateful also to others who read and commented on all, or part, of the book at different stages: Sir Kenneth Dover (St Andrews) who gave me the opportunity to learn from his latest work on Greek prose style; Mr James Longrigg (University of Newcastle-upon- Tyne) who gave support and guidance, especially on the Presocratics; Dr Philip van der Eijk (also Newcastle-upon-Tyne) who made many perceptive observations; Dr Helen King (University of Reading) who was helpful on Hippocratic gynaecology. It is a pleasure to thank Professor Jacques Jouanna (Sorbonne) for a warm welcome to Paris, and for sharing his erudition in person and in correspondence as well as in print.

For assistance on medical matters, I thank Dr Donald Coid who listened, laughed, and lent Gray Anatomy in the difficult early . . .

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