The History of Napoleon the First - Vol. 3

The History of Napoleon the First - Vol. 3

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The History of Napoleon the First - Vol. 3

The History of Napoleon the First - Vol. 3

Read FREE!

Excerpt

IT now remains for me to relate by what a strange series of events Prussia was drawn into taking the place of vanquished Austria on the field of battle.

The day after the battle of Austerlitz the Emperor Francis demanded an interview with his conqueror. A general without an army, and a sovereign without states, this prince had no longer any other refuge than Hungary, which his brother, the archduke, was henceforth unable to defend against us. He came to Napoleon's bivouac. He, the representative of ten centuries of grandeur, of power and of pride, humiliated himself before this upstart, intoxicated with such a triumph, and obtained as a favour an armistice, of which the first condition was that he should separate his cause from that of Alexander, and that the Russians should immediately evacuate his states by regulated marches. Disgusted with his part of generalissimo, and depressed by the scenes of horror which he had witnessed, Alexander eagerly ratified a convention which released him, by the demand of his ally, from all his obligations towards Austria. The Czar was then at Holisch, beyond the Morava. It has been asserted, on the strength of one of Napoleon's bulletins and a boast of Savary, that this prince was in a desperate situation, and that he only owed his safety on this occasion to the magnanimity of Napoleon. But this magnanimity appears very contestable: for, in the first place, when Napoleon granted the armistice he was in . . .

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