The Interpretation of Religious Experience - Vol. 2

The Interpretation of Religious Experience - Vol. 2

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The Interpretation of Religious Experience - Vol. 2

The Interpretation of Religious Experience - Vol. 2

Read FREE!

Excerpt

The conclusion at which we had arrived at the end of last lecture was that the absolute opposition of faith and knowledge is one that cannot from any point of view be legitimately maintained; that, on the contrary, that which in faith is present in an unreflective form must be clearly grasped by thought and shown to be in its permanent elements capable of consistent and systematic statement in a theology or philosophy of religion. We cannot be satisfied with an appeal to immediate conviction, or avoid the toil and difficulty of investigation, by falling back upon "the faith once delivered to the saints"; nor is it possible to rest satisfied with the creation of mythological fictions, however comforting they may be; but we must be prepared to show that the truths of religion admit of rational defence and systematic statement. The possibility of constructing a philosophy of religion presupposes these two principles: firstly, that the universe is rational; and, secondly, that it is capable of being comprehended in its essential nature by us; and unless we are convinced of their truth, we cannot advance a single step. It will therefore prepare the way for a more positive treatment, if we ask what conception of the universe must be held on the assumption that it is in itself completely rational and can be known by us to be completely rational.

To take the last point first, it is manifest that, admitting . . .

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