Strategically Integrated HRD: Partnering to Maximize Organizational Performance

Strategically Integrated HRD: Partnering to Maximize Organizational Performance

Strategically Integrated HRD: Partnering to Maximize Organizational Performance

Strategically Integrated HRD: Partnering to Maximize Organizational Performance

Synopsis

In many companies, the "human resources" department is viewed as a nebulous, bureaucratic, and relatively peripheral administrative entity responsible for managing the details of Ling, training, benefits, and compensation, but not setting strategic goals, creating product, or generating profits. In Strategically Integrated HRD, the authors argue that in order to survive, the human resources function must be seamlessly integrated throughout the company; at the same time, the expertise and experience of the individuals trained in human resource development are essential to the organization's abilities to achieve continuous learning, improve effectiveness, measure performance, and adapt to change. This book provides a step-by-step approach for transforming HRD and unleashing its potential throughout the organization.

Excerpt

Many human resource development (HRD) professionals spend much of their time designing classroom-based training events; others behave as if their mission were to conduct workshops, seminars, meetings, and conferences. Consequently, they view training as an end unto itself. This belief is reinforced by management when they do not use HRD as a strategic tool in improving organizational performance and effectiveness. Moreover, training vendors, professional associations, and direct mail distributors reinforce this belief when they guarantee that they can fix every possible organizational ill using the latest ten-step format, the newest training games, or the "four-quadrant anything." With this type of reinforcement, it is not surprising that HRD professionals fail to understand the importance of becoming strategic partners within an organization.

When HRD professionals believe that the business of HRD is to deliver training for training's sake, all their energy is directed toward the number of training courses they deliver and the number of employees they train. Consequently, they rely on employees' responses to training as a means to justify HRD's existence rather than focusing on learning transfer or the impact of training. Is this philosophy of HRD the most appropriate way of helping improve organizational performance and effectiveness? Let's consider the parable of the sower as a way of examining this question.

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