Supportive Therapy: A Psychodynamic Approach

Supportive Therapy: A Psychodynamic Approach

Supportive Therapy: A Psychodynamic Approach

Supportive Therapy: A Psychodynamic Approach

Synopsis

This superb new book is the first to provide a carefully designed clinical approach to supportive psychotherapy that is rigorously connected to psychodynamic therapy. Notes and Index.

Excerpt

Though their roots can be traced far back into history, to soothsayers and ancient prophets, and to priests and primitive medicine men, modern dynamic psychology and psychotherapy derive firmly from the scientific psychology innovated by Freud. The psychoanalysis developed by Freud as a purified product out of the congeries of therapeutic approaches in vogue in his time, or experimentally introduced by him and his first co-worker Breuer--electrical stimulations, rest cures, hypnotic suggestion, forced associations on command, and so forth--soon became the scientific therapy. Freud's intent, pursued unswervingly through his lifetime, was to develop psychoanalysis as a therapy unto itself, thoroughly divorced from its suspect origins in hypnosis and suggestion.

In this pursuit, Freud and his principal lieutenants in the endeavor, Jones and Glover, did an unwitting disservice to the future development of modern-day scientific and dynamic psychotherapy, in obscuring the theoretical and technical complexities involved in the concepts and practice of psychoanalytically informed and guided psychotherapy under the excessively encompassing rubric of suggestion, employed to cover (and thereby to blur) a diversity of distinct principles and practices. This approach served the field well enough during Freud's life- time, and prior to Hitler's march across Europe and the genocidal slaughter of World War II, when most psychoanalysts and the full intellectual vigor of psychoanalysis as theory and as therapy were still in the central European heartland--in Austria, and in extensions into Switzerland, Hungary, and Germany. There, shunned by both organized medicine and the university world, psychoanalysis had had to develop and be practiced solely as a private enterprise applied to the neurotic outpatients who came to it. The prospective patients were found either amenable to psychoanalysis, the one available scientific psychotherapy of the time, or unsuitable. If the latter, they were in-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.