Southern Renascence the Literature of the Modern South

Southern Renascence the Literature of the Modern South

Southern Renascence the Literature of the Modern South

Southern Renascence the Literature of the Modern South

Excerpt

The idea for the present volume was conceived two years ago on a moderate enough scale. The editors, who were also the editors of The Hopkins Review, planned for that magazine a series of perhaps three essays in which the more obvious characteristics of the host of modern Southern writers might be touched on. The response to the project, however, was so overwhelming, and so encouraging, that it was realized just how widespread was the latent interest in Southern writing, and how potentially important a thoroughgoing survey and analysis of the literature of the modern South might be. Accordingly, plans were expanded tenfold, and the present volume is the result.

Almost all of the essays in this volume were originally published in The Hopkins Review. Two kinds of essays were sought: those which would present a detailed analysis of a single author, and those which would work across the field in an attempt to delineate common themes. No single critical outlook, no one critical approach is embodied in this volume. Persons of varying tastes and interests were intentionally selected as contributors. Nor have the editors intended that the views embodied in the essays coincide with their own views.

The editors hope that the volume provides the first reasonably thorough treatment of the literature of the modern South. They are aware that gaps exist in the presentation. They were unable, for example, to secure a competent study of the many obvious relationships between the Southern Agrarian critics of the 1930s on the one hand, and the increased emphasis upon traditional religious values evidenced throughout the western world during the past two decades on the other. There seemed to be a strong tie implicit there. Neither was it possible to secure a general overall treatment of the modern Southern poets.

The editors wish to make the following acknowledgments. Mr. Donald Davidson, of Vanderbilt University, both contributed an . . .

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