Lenin: Red Dictator

Lenin: Red Dictator

Lenin: Red Dictator

Lenin: Red Dictator

Excerpt

The Russian Revolution began in the year 1905. By 1907 the movement had started to decline rapidly. There came a lull, which with the good fortune of peace might have directed the further march of Russian events along the line of evolution instead of revolution.

The World War led to a new outburst of revolutionary forces in Russia. The processes it set in motion have not reached an end even now, thirteen years after the beginning of the Second Revolution.

One of the causes contributing to revolution in Russia was a check in general social and political development, noticeable particularly after the end of the eighteenth century. This was complicated by the fact that Russian life in certain of its aspects changed very swiftly, out of proportion to the gradual rise in the general level of social and political standards. In the eighteenth century the Russian state differed very little in structure from other states on the continent of Europe. In the political sphere there prevailed absolute monarchy, in the sphere of social relations the overlordship of the feudal holders of great landed estates and --in greater or less degree--serfdom for the peasants. Europe, however, commenced to throw off these earlier forms of life much more quickly than did Russia. New ways of political and social action were established in France after the end of the eighteenth century, and in German states at the beginning or in the middle of the . . .

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