Mankind, Nation and Individual from a Linguistic Point of View

Mankind, Nation and Individual from a Linguistic Point of View

Mankind, Nation and Individual from a Linguistic Point of View

Mankind, Nation and Individual from a Linguistic Point of View

Excerpt

I have undertaken to speak of Language in its relation to Mankind at large, to the Nation and to the Individual. There is no doubt or ambiguity as to the meaning of Mankind or the meaning of the Individual; but the term Nation is by no means so clearly defined. It has never been settled what is to be understood by a Nation. Many will say that the Swiss form a Nation in spite of the fact that they speak three, or indeed four, different languages. On the other hand it is maintained that Great Britain and the United States are two distinct nations in spite of their having a single language. As early as the middle of the nineteenth century people began to speak of a Canadian nationality or an Australian nationality on the ground that the inhabitants of these lands in spite of their linguistic and political ties to the mother‐ country were beginning to feel themselves in some way different from Englishmen at home. Portuguese and Brazilians, Spaniards and Argentines are also illustrations of the fact that something more than a com-

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