Readings in Social Security

Readings in Social Security

Readings in Social Security

Readings in Social Security

Excerpt

"The ... organization of social insurance should be treated as one part only of a comprehensive policy of social progress. Social insurance fully developed may provide income security; it is an attack upon Want. But Want is one only of five giants on the road of reconstruction and in some ways the easiest to attack. The others are Disease, Ignorance, Squalor and Idleness."

Sir William (now Lord) Beveridge, SOCIAL INSURANCE AND ALLIED
SERVICES. New York: The Macmillan Company, 1942, p. 6.

"... I suggest that [Congress] study the desirability of repealing the Social Security Act before the Nation is entirely engulfed by the legislative program which is being promoted. If we do not save ourselves now, I believe we are headed straight for State Socialism and dictatorship via a comprehensive scheme of National Compulsory Social Security for the entire population. If the Congress fails to see the whole picture and fails to act, the Nation is In grave danger of succumbing to a dual-purpose Social Security program designed to tax, and tax, and tax—rule, regulate, and regiment."

Marjorie Shearon, Testimony Before Senate Committee on Edu
cation and Labor
on S. 545 and S. 1320, JANUARY 30, 1948.

FEW PERSONS question the need for social security for themselves, or for their children and their neighbors, or even the nation as a whole. But there are major differences of opinion upon how such security can best be attained.

The timeless quest for social security has resulted in many different ways and means to achieve that goal. The modern development of social security began in the 1880's when Chancellor Bismarck in Germany inaugurated a social insurance program. Since that time every major industrial nation has established some type of social security program. Regardless of political or economic philosophy, whether democratic or totalitarian, governments throughout the world have instituted, retained, or expanded social security programs.

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