Relationship Marketing: Successful Strategies for the Age of the Customer

Relationship Marketing: Successful Strategies for the Age of the Customer

Relationship Marketing: Successful Strategies for the Age of the Customer

Relationship Marketing: Successful Strategies for the Age of the Customer

Synopsis

The bestselling author of The Regis Touch expands on his previous work to focus on building crucial relationships that help a company dominate--and own--the market in this age of the customer. Includes stories, insights, and advice to give readers an edge in today's fiercely competitive climate.

Excerpt

The Regis Touch was compiled and written during the late 1970s; and early 1980s. This was a time some consider the golden age of venture capital and the entrepreneurial-lead technology revolution. During that time, the company that positioned its particular product or technology in the marketplace early became the big winner. Gaining recognition was an objective in itself. Managements focused inward on the technology and on their organizations. Getting public attention constituted marketing. In the personal computer industry, the distribution channel often was considered the only customer. Establishing new technology and new markets required company leaders to become evangelists. Designing technology to meet customer needs often became secondary. For a while, customers were fascinated by the proliferation and variety of technology. Customers were able to do things they hadn't been able to do before at any price. But the "whole product; " or "total solution," was seldom delivered. Service was considered synonymous with repair.

Image was considered something that could be fabricated, designed on Madison Avenue, and overlaid on any company. Perception out-distanced reality by a country mile. In the late '80s reality set in. The customer became the center of attention. High-growth companies always have difficulty keeping reality and perception in balance. When your company is successful, the marketplace seems to set expectations for you. It acts as a temptress, luring you to do and say things you feel are required of you. Add to that the uncertainty that prevails over rapid success and equally rapid failure in the hightech businesses and the obsession most managements have with creating and holding market positions becomes understandable. There seems to be a constant, incessant push to proselytize the world. Often, instead of concentrating on building a credible position, management spends its time striving to meet the demands of perception.

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