Integrative Problem-Centered Therapy: A Synthesis of Family, Individual, and Biological Therapies

Integrative Problem-Centered Therapy: A Synthesis of Family, Individual, and Biological Therapies

Integrative Problem-Centered Therapy: A Synthesis of Family, Individual, and Biological Therapies

Integrative Problem-Centered Therapy: A Synthesis of Family, Individual, and Biological Therapies

Synopsis

In this innovative book, William M. Pinsof provides a comprehensive framework for the responsible, cost-effective, and creative conduct of psychotherapy in the face of these challenges, Integrative Problem-Centered Therapy lays out a clear structure for combining the major theories and techniques from family therapy, individual therapy, and biological psychiatry. This structure rests on systems theory and attempts to build on the healthy resources within individuals and families, giving guidelines for what to do when and with whom.

Excerpt

Contemporary psychotherapists face two major challenges. The first is to use effectively the various psychotherapeutic methods that have emerged within the last half of the twentieth century. The second, spurred on by the implementation of managed care, is to practice psychotherapy within time and financial constraints. The first constitutes the challenge of effective integration; the second, the challenge of cost- effectiveness.

This book presents a framework for the cost-effective integration of the major psychotherapies that have dominated the field at the end of the twentieth century. This framework, termed integrative problem-centered therapy, draws on recent advances within family therapy, individual psychotherapy, and biobehavioral medicine. It organizes these macro approaches, as well as specific approaches within each of them, with maximal efficiency. Although not essentially a time-limited therapy, problem-centered therapy can be used within a time-limited framework to provide effective episodes of care.

Viewing psychotherapy as human problem solving, the first chapter presents the core problem-centered concept: that voluntary psychotherapy rests on an informal contract in which the patient system hires the therapist system to help solve certain problems. These presenting problems define the starting point, ultimate reference points, and major outcome criteria for therapy. Each presenting problem has a unique problem-maintenance structure embodying constraints that block the patient system from solving the problem. These constraints derive from six metaframeworks: social organization; biology; meaning, with special reference to culture and gender; transgenerational . . .

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