Northern Underground: Episodes of Russian Revolutinary Transport and Communications through Scandinavia and Finland, 1863-1917

Northern Underground: Episodes of Russian Revolutinary Transport and Communications through Scandinavia and Finland, 1863-1917

Northern Underground: Episodes of Russian Revolutinary Transport and Communications through Scandinavia and Finland, 1863-1917

Northern Underground: Episodes of Russian Revolutinary Transport and Communications through Scandinavia and Finland, 1863-1917

Excerpt

Gazing out over the roofs of Copenhagen, I ran through in my mind the previous stages of my quest for the truth about the bolshevik Jacob Fürstenberg, also known as Hanecki, once a business-man in Copenhagen.

Like every student of the Russian revolution, I knew of the accusations made against Fürstenberg-Hanecki by the Russian provisional government in July 1917, of having transmitted money from German sources to the bolsheviks in Russia.

I also knew that this bolshevik was afterwards reticent about his stay in Copenhagen before 1917, and I had found evidence that he lived there considerably longer than he subsequently made out. After much searching through Danish newspapers, and much discussion with legal historians and police officials, I had discovered that the company director Jacob Fürstenberg had been expelled from Denmark for contraband dealing early in 1917, shortly before he appeared in Stockholm as Lenin's man of confidence.

Now my search had led to the Copenhagen Law Courts, to the rooms of archives high under the roof of that graceful old building, once the town hall. Before me lay a bundle of papers-- the documents of the case of director Jacob Fürstenberg, which had been lying here since 1917.

Whatever Fürstenberg's Danish secret was, he had kept it well. There had been plenty of rumours, accusations and counter-accusations, but few facts. Was the enigmatic Fürstenberg at last to be revealed, I wondered, after more than forty years.

I opened the bundle of papers and began to glance through them. They were Danish official documents, letters in German or Russian, and commercial papers--invoices, way-bills and the like. I took a handful to examine more closely. One was a letter . . .

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