Minutes of the Albany Committee of Correspondence, 1775-1778 - Vol. 1

Minutes of the Albany Committee of Correspondence, 1775-1778 - Vol. 1

Minutes of the Albany Committee of Correspondence, 1775-1778 - Vol. 1

Minutes of the Albany Committee of Correspondence, 1775-1778 - Vol. 1

Excerpt

In 1909 the State, through the then State Historian, Victor H. Paltsits, published the Minutes of the Commissioners for Detecting and Defeating Conspiracies in the State of New York; Albany County Sessions, 1778-1781. These commissioners were a creation of the Legislature which had been organized under the Constitution of 1777. They had been preceded by various committees on disaffected persons, which had been appointed by the New York Provincial Congress or Convention. A copy of the minutes of one of these committees is in the possession of the New York Historical Society and is now being edited for publication in 1925 by Miss Dorothy C. Barck. These minutes begin with December 11, 1776, and close with September 23, 1778.

Preceding both of these committees in time of organization were the local committees of correspondence or safety set up in the counties and subdistricts of counties. If a strict order of chronological sequence in publication had been followed, therefore, this present volume of the Minutes of the Albany Committee of Correspondence, or as it styled itself "Committee of Safety, Protection and Correspondence," should have been issued first.

In view of the fact that the introductory matter in volume I of the Minutes of the Commissioners above mentioned deals with, or gives references to works which treat the whole subject of loyalism, the tories and disaffected persons, the reader and student are referred to that volume.

Of the local county committees that of Albany is the only one of New York State for which the large part of the minutes are in existence. The fragmentary Minute Book of the Committee of Safety of Tryon County was edited bySamuel L. Frey and published in 1905. Fragments and collateral evidence frequently show that the other counties, like Albany, had their committees, but the minutes as collections have, so far as is known, been lost; only another evidence, if any further is needed, of the former negligence of public records in our State.

It is not the purpose of this introduction to give a study of the origin and history of the committees of correspondence. Various studies of these have . . .

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