China's Economic Stabilization and Reconstruction

China's Economic Stabilization and Reconstruction

China's Economic Stabilization and Reconstruction

China's Economic Stabilization and Reconstruction

Excerpt

As a contribution to the research program and conference documentation of the Institute of Pacific Relations, the writer has been asked to write a book on the general subject of economic reconstruction in China. It happens that the writer has compiled a report for the Research Department of the Central Bank of China on more or less the same subject, which is therefore drawn upon to a large extent in writing the present volume. The manuscript was intended to be ready in March 1947, but current developments in China and suggestions from various friends have necessitated many additions to and revisions of the original draft, with the result that it was not completed earlier. As the question of economic stabilization is closely connected with that of economic reconstruction, much emphasis is laid upon the former and many chapters are devoted to its discussion. Consequently the title of the book has also been changed to its present one.

This volume was at first intended to be a purely factual study, but, at the suggestion of some members of the Institute of Pacific Relations, some subjective treatment has been included. It provides a perspective to the problems considered, and shows how they are approached from a Chinese viewpoint. As the writer was in the interior of China throughout the war, and had the opportunity of tackling many of the problems at first hand, this experience has been drawn upon in discussing the topics concerned. At the same time, the opinions of other Chinese, as expressed in newspaper and magazine articles, or at academic discussion groups, have been taken into account, whenever possible or necessary. Little originality is, however, claimed for the treatment, and much less profundity.

Although the writer has been connected with various government offices, the present volume is written from an academic point of view, and does not reflect the views or policies of these offices. Thousands of years of tradition have given academic people in China a certain privileged status, on account of which they may, in spite of their official positions, voice their opinions freely. Besides, the writer is not a member of any political party, and his views are therefore non-partisan.

As to the sources of information which have been drawn upon, it . . .

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