Crucial Issues in Philosophy: Studies of Current Problems and Leading Philosphers from the Standpoint of Philosophical Idealism

Crucial Issues in Philosophy: Studies of Current Problems and Leading Philosphers from the Standpoint of Philosophical Idealism

Crucial Issues in Philosophy: Studies of Current Problems and Leading Philosphers from the Standpoint of Philosophical Idealism

Crucial Issues in Philosophy: Studies of Current Problems and Leading Philosphers from the Standpoint of Philosophical Idealism

Excerpt

I became Director of the School of Philosophy at the University of Southern California at Los Angeles on July 1, 1946. While serving as Director, I prepared special lectures for a number of the different programs of the Philosophy Forum sponsored by the School of Philosophy. In June, 1949, I was chosen to participate in the Institute of Philosophy which is conducted annually by the College of the Pacific at Lake Tahoe, Nevada. In May, 1952, I was invited to address a Conference on the Philosophy of Religion held at the University of Oregon. Several of the essays assembled in this volume were originally prepared as lectures for these various public convocations.

The essays in Part I discuss vital issues with the emphasis more on practical than on theoretical problems. For the most part these essays represent the author's reflections on some crucial issues now facing the American people, engaged as they are in the titanic struggle known as the cold war. They are here assembled in the hope that they may help to clarify the confused thinking on the issues involved which is so widespread in the United States today, thereby furthering our stupendous national efforts to defend and to conserve our cultural heritage, upon the preservation of which, indeed, depend all the liberties of ourselves and of our posterity. The concluding essay in Part I aims to refute the audacious and preposterous thesis of the therapeutic positivists.

Part II consists of studies of outstanding philosophers who have made durable contributions to ethics, political and social philosophy, metaphysics, philosophy of history, and philosophy of religion. In preparing these essays my major purpose was expository rather than critical. I hope that readers in quest for wisdom may be induced to study some of the original writings of these gifted thinkers. The essay entitled "Precursors of Descartes' Cogito Argument" (Ch. XXVI) consists in part of a paper read at the Pacific Division of the American Philosophical Association at Stanford University in December, 1953.

Serving as Director of the Foundation for the Promotion ofIdealistic Philosophy . . .

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